High Speed Photography – How It’s Done

Today, a few classmates and I experimented with high speed photography during May Term in our “In the Blink of an Eye” photography course. We used two DLSR cameras so we could capture images at different angles. The DSLRS used were a Nikon D3300 and a Canon 80d which were both mounted on tripods. In high speed photography, having a still camera is crucial for a good picture.

The settings used on the cameras were a shutter speed set at BULB and an aperture of 5.6. We then mounted an Altura Flash to a Vanguard Monopod. We had the flash and the cameras pointed at a table with a black cloth covering it. Also, we had a black velvet backdrop that was clamped to the wall behind the table. Attached to the table was a sensor which then had a wire that ran to the flash. The role of the sensor was that when a loud noise was heard it would trigger the flash to go off. We placed various fruits on the table and one of us stood behind with a hammer. We created a system to have efficient shooting of the fruit. First, someone would turn off the light switch when both the people operating the cameras were ready. Once the light had been turned off, the shutters of the two cameras would be released by the people operating them. Once this was done, the cameramen would then tell the person behind the table to strike the fruit. The loud noise of the hammer would trigger the sensor making one single flash. After the flash was made, the cameramen then closed the shutter. The lights could then have been turned off after that. The reason why it was crucial to have a dark room was because when the cameras were set to bulb, no light was getting in when the shutter was opened. When the sensor was triggered it allowed light to enter the camera at the exact same moment as when the hammer made contact with the fruit. This made it so the only image registered by the camera was that event. This process led to some very interesting pictures and I am excited to do this tomorrow again.unnamed-1.jpgunnamed.jpg

Melinda

DSC_2663.JPG Melinda is a beautiful barn owl at Wing Wilds, Inc in Honeoye Falls, New York. Wild Wings is a place where permanently injured, non-releasable birds are housed and cared for. As part of our May Term at Allendale Columbia, we were lucky to visit Wild Wings and photograph some of these amazing birds.  Melinda by far was the most photogenic, allowing me to take some great close up shots. This is a special place for me since when my Grandfather passed away a few years ago, our family requested any donations to go to Wild Wings. These birds are beautiful and the work they do here is important to help people learn about these animals and how to protect and respect them.

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Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden – May Term Day 4

Today we had to switich things up due to the weather. BayCreek Paddling was not an option, so we headed over to the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden  at The Strong.  This was great for many of the first time photographers, as there were plenty of opportunities to get some great shots of the birds and butterflies.

 

May Term – Day 3 – Montezuma

Day two at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge was even better than the first day. We went earlier in the morning, leaving Rochester around 8:30. The animals seemed more active in the morning, and this allowed for some great shots.

Mrs. Lisi and Mrs. Wun have been awesome. They have arranged these amazing field trips and experiences to allow for us to do this work. I cannot wait for tomorrow.

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Home Sweet Home
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On the Waters Edge
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Reflection
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Wetlands
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Busy in Montezuma
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Outing
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Winged Reflection

Endangered – the Ring Tailed Lemur

The ring-tailed lemur is iconic because it’s the most recognizable kind of lemur. It’s black, gray and white tail make them pretty obvious to pick out.  It was an honor seeing them when I traveled to Madagascar, and they were one of my favorite things to photography while I was there. According to a new study by the University of Victoria in British Columbia and the University of Colorado Boulder in 2016, the number of ring-tailed lemurs is guessed to be around 2,500 in Madagascar, the only place where they exist. Here are some of my favorite shots. These lemurs were in Anja Reserve, a protected area in Madagascar.

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One Cubic Foot

In May, I’ll be leaving with 14 other students from Allendale Columbia School to go to Madagascar for a few weeks to study in Ranomanfana National Park. We will be studying at the Centre ValBio.  The trip will mostly revolve around a project led by the Seneca Park Zoo, scientists from the Smithsonian, and National Geographic Photographer, David Liittschwager.   The project is called One Cubic Foot. The goal of the project is to see the amount of biodiversity in a cubic foot in any given location. Today, we placed the cube on our school campus in a nearby creek. After about an hour of waiting, we took any organisms we found in the cube and photographed them. This was good practice for what we would be doing in Madagascar.

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Getting dirt from where the cube was resting
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The cubic foot resting in Allens Creek
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An unidentified creature
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Allens Creek Inhabitant
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Newt

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